Tour of Euer Valley

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This hike was a guided tour on Tahoe Donner Association (TDA) property, including newly acquired parcels in the Euer Valley adjacent to the Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Area.  Part of the purpose of the tour was to become familiar with the property boundaries and how the boundaries are indicated, in order to respect the boundaries, actual and potential easements with neighboring property owners, and the location of adjacent parcels of National Forest Service land.  In general, National Forest Service land in the area is part of the Tahoe National Forest.

The tour began at the Cross Country Ski Center (Equestrian Center in the summer time) and generally followed the route of existing winter-time cross country ski trails down to the Euer Valley floor.  After exploring the zigzag west end of the TDA property, the group crossed the valley floor and hiked up to the Euer Ridge Trail, which overlooks Crabtree Canyon, passes through a Forest Service parcel, and continues east near the north TDA property boundary.  We returned to the Cross Country Ski Center via cross country ski trails.

GPS track

GPS track

As we hiked down to the valley floor, we were struck by how beautifully green the valley is in the early summer.

picture of lush green Euer Valley in summer

Lush green Euer Valley in summer

During the exploration of the west end of the TDA property, I also particularly noticed how tall the trees are.  It was a wonderful walk through the forest.

image of beautiful tall trees

Beautiful tall trees

After exploring the property corner markers (see “prongs” on the GPS track) we started across the valley floor, crossing the South Fork of Prosser Creek near the Coyote Hut, a warming hut for the Cross Country Ski Area.  In the picture, the fence marks the property line.  The creek runs through the metal culverts in the center foreground.  It was quite interesting for the hikers who also cross-country ski to see what the ski trail looks like without snow.  I never realized that the creek crossing is just snow on top of metal culverts!

picture of Coyote Hut (cross country ski warming hut) and culverts making the South Fork Prosser Creek crossing

Coyote Hut (cross country ski warming hut) and culverts making the South Fork Prosser Creek crossing

After crossing the valley floor along the ski trail, we took a side trail and started the main climb of the day, with a little over 500 feet of elevation gain, up toward the Euer Ridge Trail.

Elevation profile

Elevation profile

From the ridge we had nice views out toward the nearby hills and between to the next hills.  If I remember the discussion by more experienced peak-identifiers, Mount Lola may be in the background of this picture.

photo of the view from Euer Ridge

View from Euer Ridge

This picture is looking back across the Euer Valley toward one of the cross country ski trails along the side of the hill.

photo of the view across Euer Valley with a cross country ski trail on the hillside

View across Euer Valley with a cross country ski trail on the hillside

Finally, this is nearby Red Mountain, aptly named and easily recognizable.

image of Red Mountain

Red Mountain

In this area, the highest elevation of the day, we very briefly walked on, or close to, the Crabtree Canyon ski trail.  We then proceeded east through a National Forest Service parcel along the Euer Ridge and started the descent back to the Euer Valley where we re-encountered the ski trails at a major junction (Intersection 14).  From there we followed the ski trails back to the start.

For the group, nearly all of whom are property owners in Tahoe Donner, this was a fantastic up-close-and-personal perspective on some of the wonderful property that we co-own through the Homeowners Association.  It gave a new meaning to the term ”pride of ownership”!

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